How To: Flying Geese Pattern and Why I Love Quilt Kits

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I love quilting, I really do.  I’m just not very good at it.  However, I’m really good at following directions (I never run with scissors).  Oh, and I’m not really good at math, either, so trying to make a quilted item without a calculator really stumps me.  How much fabric do I actually need of each color/pattern, anyway?

 

That’s why I love quilting kits.  Everything is done for me:  the pretty fabric already chosen and at the right measurements (yard, half yard, fat quarter – what, as opposed to skinny or something?), the instructions and a picture of the finished product.  All I have to do is cut the fabric to the specified shapes and measurements and follow the directions.  But the best part of a kit?  You learn new techniques that you can apply to other projects in the future.  I’m all about learning how to do new things in the easiest way possible and sharing with my fellow crafters.

 

So, without further ado, here are easy instructions on how to make the Flying Geese pattern – which is used in so many quilting projects – that I recently learned while doing my latest quilt kit.

 

In this case, we are using 5 squares: four 2-3/8″ squares and one 4-1/4″ square.

 

IMG_0937

 

Draw a line down the center of one small square, point to point.  Then draw a line 1/4″ apart on each side of that center line:

 

FG2

 

Do that on both small squares.

 

Place the two small square in the opposite corners of the large square (so the lines match up).

 

FG3

 

Sew in between the center line and the outside 1/4″ line on both sides of center line:

 

FG4H

 

Cut down the center line (in between the stitch lines) and separate the two halves.  On one half, place one small square at the corner of the large square, point to point:

 

FG5

 

Draw a line down the center of small square as above.  Draw 1/4″ lines on either side of the center line and stitch as before between the two lines on both sides of the center line.

 

 

Cut down the center line (in between the stitch lines) and separate the two halves.  Press.

 

FG6

 

Do the same with the other half of the large square separated in the beginning.  You will now have four flying geese units.

 

These can be sewn together in a variety of ways.  For this project, they are sewn together end-to-end:

 

FG2pieces

 

Here is the project with the Flying Geese pattern incorporated:

 

FG8

 

When the project is complete, I’ll be sure to post the final result!

 

In case you are wondering, this quilt kit is called Lavender Love Table Runner Kit and can be found at connectingthreads.com for $15.57 (although I was able to get it on sale at the time I bought it).

 

 

Have a comment or question?  Fire away below!  Want to learn more quilting patterns?  Let us know!

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